Camp Allen Camp and Conference Center

The information on this page was last updated 6/13/2022. If you see errors or omissions, please email: info@ministrywatch.com


Summary

Established in 1921 by the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, Camp Allen is a year-round facility located one hour northwest of Houston near Navasota, Texas. Camp Allen accommodates a variety of spiritual, social, corporate, and educational events for all ages in addition to our founding summer camp program. Our 1,100 beautiful acres features a hotel and conference center, dormitory campsites, lakeside log cabins, two lakes, miles of trails, and much more. We invite you to explore, retreat, and awaken your spirit in our piney woods!


Contact information

Mailing address:
Camp Allen Camp and Conference Center
18800 FM 362
Navasota, TX 77868

Website: campallen.org

Phone: 936-825-7175

Email: info@campallen.org


Organization details

EIN: 746016479

CEO/President: George Dehan

Chairman: The Rt. Rev. Andrew Doyle

Board size: 29

Founder: Rt. Rev. Clinton S. Quin & Rosa Lum Allen

Ruling year: 1940

Tax deductible: Yes

Fiscal year end: 12/31

Member of ECFA: No

Member of ECFA since:


Purpose


Mission statement

Camp Allen honors God and enriches lives by being a year-round gathering place for all ages, offering Christian hospitality amidst 1,100 forested acres, and striving for excellence in facilities, service, and programs.


Statement of faith

Donor confidence score

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Transparency grade

D

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Financial efficiency ratings

Sector: Camps/Conference Centers

CategoryRatingOverall rankSector rank
Overall efficiency rating446 of 10318 of 26
Fund acquisition rating520 of 103315 of 28
Resource allocation rating559 of 10339 of 28
Asset utilization rating371 of 103110 of 26

Financial ratios

Funding ratiosSector median20202019201820172016
Return on fundraising efforts Return on fundraising efforts =
Fundraising expense /
Total contributions
6%6%9%10%6%29%
Fundraising cost ratio Fundraising cost ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total revenue
3%4%3%4%3%5%
Contributions reliance Contributions reliance =
Total contributions /
Total revenue
48%57%37%38%49%16%
Fundraising expense ratio Fundraising expense ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total expenses
3%4%4%5%5%5%
Other revenue reliance Other revenue reliance =
Total other revenue /
Total revenue
52%43%63%62%51%84%
 
Operating ratiosSector median20202019201820172016
Program expense ratio Program expense ratio =
Program services /
Total expenses
82%85%88%88%90%90%
Spending ratio Spending ratio =
Total expenses /
Total revenue
101%101%86%79%68%104%
Program output ratio Program output ratio =
Program services /
Total revenue
86%87%76%69%61%93%
Savings ratio Savings ratio =
Surplus (deficit) /
Total revenue
-1%-1%14%21%32%-4%
Reserve accumulation rate Reserve accumulation rate =
Surplus (deficit) /
Net assets
0%-1%9%16%236%12%
General and admin ratio General and admin ratio =
Management and general expense /
Total expenses
16%11%8%7%5%6%
 
Investing ratiosSector median20202019201820172016
Total asset turnover Total asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total assets
0.340.350.440.480.510.63
Degree of long-term investment Degree of long-term investment =
Total assets /
Total current assets
6.0810.823.453.083.6916.29
Current asset turnover Current asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total current assets
2.023.841.521.471.8610.23
 
Liquidity ratiosSector median20202019201820172016
Current ratio Current ratio =
Total current assets /
Total current liabilities
3.291.443.745.303.970.70
Current liabilities ratio Current liabilities ratio =
Total current liabilities /
Total current assets
0.300.690.270.190.251.42
Liquid reserve level Liquid reserve level =
(Total current assets -
Total current liabilities) /
(Total expenses / 12)
3.080.965.806.614.82-0.50
 
Solvency ratiosSector median20202019201820172016
Liabilities ratio Liabilities ratio =
Total liabilities /
Total assets
12%17%18%18%90%118%
Debt ratio Debt ratio =
Debt /
Total assets
2%10%10%12%16%20%
Reserve coverage ratio Reserve coverage ratio =
Net assets /
Total expenses
270%234%187%172%20%-29%

Financials

Balance sheet
 
Assets20202019201820172016
Cash$462,134$2,148,364$2,106,387$1,360,020$45,844
Receivables, inventories, prepaids$1,237,066$3,256,783$3,284,828$2,658,508$640,865
Short-term investments$0$0$0$0$0
Other current assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total current assets$1,699,200$5,405,147$5,391,215$4,018,528$686,709
Long-term investments$0$0$0$0$0
Fixed assets$16,683,389$13,240,852$11,226,427$10,793,208$10,498,554
Other long-term assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total long-term assets$16,683,389$13,240,852$11,226,427$10,793,208$10,498,554
Total assets$18,382,589$18,645,999$16,617,642$14,811,736$11,185,263
 
Liabilities20202019201820172016
Payables and accrued expenses$389,676$705,665$325,704$305,349$238,169
Other current liabilities$786,650$738,684$691,786$706,871$739,054
Total current liabilities$1,176,326$1,444,349$1,017,490$1,012,220$977,223
Debt$1,926,060$1,835,377$1,965,615$2,302,361$2,234,134
Due to (from) affiliates$0$0$0$0$0
Other long-term liabilities$0$0$0$10,010,000$10,000,000
Total long-term liabilities$1,926,060$1,835,377$1,965,615$12,312,361$12,234,134
Total liabilities$3,102,386$3,279,726$2,983,105$13,324,581$13,211,357
 
Net assets20202019201820172016
Without donor restrictions$13,061,073$6,735,760$6,954,632($4,090,532)($3,472,217)
With donor restrictions$2,219,130$8,630,513$6,679,905$5,577,687$1,446,123
Net assets$15,280,203$15,366,273$13,634,537$1,487,155($2,026,094)
 
Revenues and expenses
 
Revenue20202019201820172016
Total contributions$3,672,791$3,552,144$3,790,692$5,366,342$1,104,605
Program service revenue$2,750,044$5,977,357$6,167,150$5,595,069$5,680,363
Membership dues$0$0$0$0$0
Investment income$14,053$27,596$23,265$1,319$0
Other revenue($4,538)($14,985)$104,688$38,639($6,196)
Total other revenue$2,759,559$5,989,968$6,295,103$5,635,027$5,674,167
Total revenue$6,432,350$9,542,112$10,085,795$11,001,369$6,778,772
 
Expenses20202019201820172016
Program services$5,570,808$7,222,163$6,979,005$6,755,605$6,305,266
Management and general$716,706$663,589$575,772$383,749$397,794
Fundraising$230,906$314,823$383,636$348,766$323,576
Total expenses$6,518,420$8,200,575$7,938,413$7,488,120$7,026,636
 
Change in net assets20202019201820172016
Surplus (deficit)($86,070)$1,341,537$2,147,382$3,513,249($247,864)
Other changes in net assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total change in net assets($86,070)$1,341,537$2,147,382$3,513,249($247,864)

Compensation

NameTitleCompensation
Bishop Andrew DoyleChairman$619,984
George J DehanPresident$230,560

Compensation data as of: 12/31/2020


Response from ministry

No response has been provided by this ministry.


The information below was provided to MinistryWatch by the ministry itself. It was last updated 6/13/2022. To update the information below, please email: info@ministrywatch.com


History

Turning into the driveway of the serene, treelined 1,100 acre property, one might not guess the humble beginnings of Camp Allen...

It all started with one innovative idea, two determined individuals, 36 campers, a handful of tents, and a sky full of stars. In the early 1900s, Rt. Rev. Clinton S. Quin, the Bishop Coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, shared a dream with prominent Houstonian and devout Christian Rosa Lum Allen: to create a place for young people in parishes to go deeper in their faith. Rosa so heartily agreed with his sentiment that she opened up her family's estate on Galveston Bay as a trial location for this brand new idea of a summer camp. Hence, in the summer of 1921 in a backyard near Sylvan Beach, Camp Allen became the first summer camp of the Episcopal Church. (The original Camp Allen property is visible today from Bayshore Drive in La Porte, Texas, and the railroad car that campers rode to camp has been preserved at the Sylvan Beach Depot Museum.)

Those first few summers on Galveston Bay were sweet and simple. Staff members were chosen by Bishop Quin himself, several of which became priests who would be leaders in the Diocese for many years to come. Campers lodged in Rosa's spacious home, and participated in group activities like fishing and hiking. However, popularity grew so much that only a few years later it became clear that Camp Allen had outgrown Rosa's estate. Continuing in her generosity, she gifted Camp Allen with a plot of land 7 miles from Goose Creek at the head of Trinity Bay. This second location was ideal for a summer camp. With 14 acres of green pastures with a bay frontage of 600 feet and a 30-foot bluff, the activities were limitless. Even traveling to Camp Allen was exciting: because the roads to Trinity Bay were impassible by car, campers journeyed to camp via the "Ethel B," a ship that traveled down the Houston ship channel to Camp's pier.

In the 1930s, with the constant blooming of the summer camp ministry, Camp Allen had a platform to offer even more to its community. Development began at Trinity Bay to make the site ideal for hosting not just campers, but anyone for retreats, conferences, and meetings. It was then that the Clergy Conference began to meet at Camp Allen, which still meets annually to this day. Meanwhile, summer camp continued to flourish, hosting more and more children each summer.

In the 1950s Camp Allen continued to grow. Facilities expanded and summer camp became more and more innovative. Campers came from all around Texas came to experience folk dancing, crafts, masquerade parties, treasure hunts, drama, singing, crabbing, baseball, archery, tennis, and swimming. They woke up to Morning Prayer and celebrated with "Canteen" every Thursday night, a tradition still held at summer camp today. At this time, the registration fee for 2 weeks at camp was only $30.

In 1968 Trinity Bay was sold to find a space that would better fit the needs of Camp Allen's rapid growth, which brings us to the Piney woods! In 1968, 700 acres were purchased in Navasota, Texas and in 1972 construction began. The conference center and rectory were erected in 1975 and Camp Allen's first two campsites hosted summer camp in 1974. By 1976, Camp Allen saw 800 campers each summer. By 1984, Campsite 3 was finished complete with an altar assembled of stones from the Shrine at Rosa's estate and the Trinity Bay location. Additionally, Campsite 3 houses a beautiful hand carved cross by Rev John Price. Plans for more expansion were soon developed and implemented under the leadership of Rt. Rev. Claude Payne and the direction of Camp Allen Rector, the Rev. David Thames. By 2000, Camp Allen had welcomed more hotel lodging, the equestrian center, 76 acre Lake Coffield, the lakeside cabins, ropes courses, and All Saints' Chapel. Campers enjoyed the newly instated "Blob" while Discovery students climbed to new heights on the ropes course. Recent additions include a Discovery Center for outdoor education, summer camp staff housing, a new playground and high ropes course, a camper health center, and renovations to the camp roads, hotel, and pavilion.

Over the past 15 years, Camp Allen has worked hard to reach more people, enhance the visitor experience, and strengthen the organization's financial position. The camp's successful growth has led to an increased need for capacity. Informed by guest feedback, the Board has identified a series of important projects to be completed before the camp's centennial in 2021. These projects are aligned with the camp's goals and strategic plan and will position Camp Allen to advance its mission for many years to come.

Camp Allen has traversed over 150 miles and 100 years to reach where it is today. With a journey from 10 to 1,100 acres, 1 to 88 full time employees, and receiving gifted land to operating on a 6.7 million dollar budget, the Camp Allen family is most proud and thankful for the lives transformed by God because of the ministry of this special place.


Program accomplishments


Needs