Orange County Rescue Mission

The information on this page was last updated 7/6/2023. If you see errors or omissions, please email: [email protected]


Summary

Orange County Rescue Mission is home to the Village of Hope, a 262-bed transitional housing program for homeless men, women and children.

Our Philosophy: To operate in a dynamic, entrepreneurial manner, expecting to grow and expand numerically, programmatically, and geographically. We seek to be constantly challenged with fresh vision and well-prepared strategies that originate with the President and the senior professional staff, and that are refined, confirmed, and approved by the Board of Directors.


Contact information

Mailing address:
Orange County Rescue Mission
1 Hope Drive
Tustin, CA 92782

Website: www.rescuemission.org

Phone: (714) 247-4300

Email: [email protected]


Organization details

EIN: 952479552

CEO/President: Bryan Crain

Chairman: Bart Hansen

Board size: 9

Founder: Lewis Whitehead

Ruling year: 1972

Tax deductible: Yes

Fiscal year end: 09/30

Member of ECFA: Yes

Member of ECFA since: 1987


Purpose

The men, women and children who enter the gates of the Orange County Rescue Mission come from many walks of life and are all wounded in different ways. None of these people ever imagined they'd be homeless and they all need our help. Our goal is to treat each person with respect and dignity. We prayerfully consider how we will implement an Individual Treatment Plan for those who come to us for help.


Mission statement

To minister the love of Jesus Christ to the Least, the Last, and the Lost of our Community through the provision of assistance in the areas of guidance, counseling, education, job training, shelter, food, clothing, health care and independent living communities.


Statement of faith

Donor confidence score

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Transparency grade

A

To understand our transparency grade, click here.


Financial efficiency ratings

Sector: Rescue Missions/Homeless Shelters

CategoryRatingOverall rankSector rank
Overall efficiency rating1011 of 1104124 of 140
Fund acquisition rating775 of 1105105 of 140
Resource allocation rating791 of 110587 of 140
Asset utilization rating1052 of 1104137 of 140

Financial ratios

Funding ratiosSector median20222021202020192018
Return on fundraising efforts Return on fundraising efforts =
Fundraising expense /
Total contributions
11%16%8%13%18%15%
Fundraising cost ratio Fundraising cost ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total revenue
10%15%8%13%18%14%
Contributions reliance Contributions reliance =
Total contributions /
Total revenue
93%98%99%97%97%98%
Fundraising expense ratio Fundraising expense ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total expenses
11%19%14%16%17%14%
Other revenue reliance Other revenue reliance =
Total other revenue /
Total revenue
7%2%1%3%3%2%
 
Operating ratiosSector median20222021202020192018
Program expense ratio Program expense ratio =
Program services /
Total expenses
79%75%80%79%78%77%
Spending ratio Spending ratio =
Total expenses /
Total revenue
89%82%57%79%104%99%
Program output ratio Program output ratio =
Program services /
Total revenue
70%62%46%62%81%76%
Savings ratio Savings ratio =
Surplus (deficit) /
Total revenue
11%18%43%21%-4%1%
Reserve accumulation rate Reserve accumulation rate =
Surplus (deficit) /
Net assets
7%6%22%10%-1%0%
General and admin ratio General and admin ratio =
Management and general expense /
Total expenses
9%6%6%5%5%8%
 
Investing ratiosSector median20222021202020192018
Total asset turnover Total asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total assets
0.520.260.290.370.390.38
Degree of long-term investment Degree of long-term investment =
Total assets /
Total current assets
2.717.7211.085.196.195.79
Current asset turnover Current asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total current assets
1.681.973.181.912.432.18
 
Liquidity ratiosSector median20222021202020192018
Current ratio Current ratio =
Total current assets /
Total current liabilities
13.919.605.415.6810.199.47
Current liabilities ratio Current liabilities ratio =
Total current liabilities /
Total current assets
0.070.100.180.180.100.11
Liquid reserve level Liquid reserve level =
(Total current assets -
Total current liabilities) /
(Total expenses / 12)
6.465.463.075.174.454.92
 
Solvency ratiosSector median20222021202020192018
Liabilities ratio Liabilities ratio =
Total liabilities /
Total assets
8%1%2%3%2%2%
Debt ratio Debt ratio =
Debt /
Total assets
1%0%0%0%0%0%
Reserve coverage ratio Reserve coverage ratio =
Net assets /
Total expenses
160%387%342%262%250%261%

Financials

Balance sheet
 
Assets20222021202020192018
Cash$7,768,441$5,150,822$9,475,928$7,261,851$7,899,834
Receivables, inventories, prepaids$1,628,453$1,039,428$1,059,289$531,828$594,861
Short-term investments$0$0$0$0$0
Other current assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total current assets$9,396,894$6,190,250$10,535,217$7,793,679$8,494,695
Long-term investments$0$0$0$0$0
Fixed assets$63,154,294$62,408,682$44,169,149$40,463,866$40,731,774
Other long-term assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total long-term assets$63,154,294$62,408,682$44,169,149$40,463,866$40,731,774
Total assets$72,551,188$68,598,932$54,704,366$48,257,545$49,226,469
 
Liabilities20222021202020192018
Payables and accrued expenses$978,584$1,143,851$1,855,348$764,973$897,143
Other current liabilities$0$0$0$0$0
Total current liabilities$978,584$1,143,851$1,855,348$764,973$897,143
Debt$0$0$0$0$0
Due to (from) affiliates$0$0$0$0$0
Other long-term liabilities$0$0$0$0$0
Total long-term liabilities$0$0$0$0$0
Total liabilities$978,584$1,143,851$1,855,348$764,973$897,143
 
Net assets20222021202020192018
Without donor restrictions$71,260,228$67,142,705$52,849,018$47,180,196$48,182,145
With donor restrictions$312,376$312,376$0$312,376$147,181
Net assets$71,572,604$67,455,081$52,849,018$47,492,572$48,329,326
 
Revenues and expenses
 
Revenue20222021202020192018
Total contributions$22,191,095$33,969,562$24,659,349$17,838,827$18,317,522
Program service revenue$308,614$142,961$214,695$146,129$266,448
Membership dues$0$0$0$0$0
Investment income$102,221$42,524$62,032$48,818$0
Other revenue$24,560$163,522$554,925$285,191$171,350
Total other revenue$435,395$349,007$831,652$480,138$437,798
Total revenue$22,626,490$34,318,569$25,491,001$18,318,965$18,755,320
 
Expenses20222021202020192018
Program services$13,917,110$15,760,347$15,891,729$14,764,149$14,331,548
Management and general$1,147,288$1,108,919$950,254$924,533$1,514,565
Fundraising$3,444,572$2,843,240$3,292,572$3,274,513$2,670,141
Total expenses$18,508,970$19,712,506$20,134,555$18,963,195$18,516,254
 
Change in net assets20222021202020192018
Surplus (deficit)$4,117,520$14,606,063$5,356,446($644,230)$239,066
Other changes in net assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total change in net assets$4,117,520$14,606,063$5,356,446($644,230)$239,066

Compensation

NameTitleCompensation
Mr Jim PalmerPresident$379,069
Mr Bryan CrainChief Operating Officer$242,944
Mr Larry GwiltChief Financial Officer$205,024
Jodie SaundersonChief HR Officer$162,043
Mrs Anna SongChief Development Officer$139,764

Compensation data as of: 9/30/2022


Response from ministry

No response has been provided by this ministry.


The information below was provided to MinistryWatch by the ministry itself. It was last updated 7/6/2023. To update the information below, please email: [email protected]


History

During the year of President Kennedy's assassination, fearful Americans anxiously awaited nuclear destruction from the sky, drugs began their invasion of the middle-class and a place called Vietnam loomed dangerously on the horizon. It was the year "Camelot" died tragically in its infancy.

In that turbulent setting, it is hardly surprising that local passers-by didn't concern themselves with the disturbance under a bridge in an "undesirable" part of town. But a husky African American soldier in the U.S. Marine Corps, acting on impulse, did stop his car to investigate. This spur-of-the-moment decision by Tech Sergeant Lewis Whitehead was to give birth to Orange County's largest and most effective Christian-based private human service organization.

What he faced under that bridge in 1963 changed his life forever. The altercation was minor (his dominating presence quelled the dispute quickly), but the sight of filthy men, women and children living under the bridge changed his vision of this community. They suffered under conditions that Sergeant Whitehead thought only existed in the poorest of nations and made a mockery of Hollywood's representation of the homeless as happy-go-lucky "hobos".

Images of those wretched people haunted his thoughts as he returned to his duty directing the mess hall at the Marine Corps Air Station, Tustin. That day, as he watched good food being thrown away, a combination of sorrow and determination overcame him.

He packed up some of this "waste" food and returned to the bridge to feed the hungry. The next day he returned again, and the next. Sergeant Whitehead held vigil with these dirty, undesirable people, gathering food and clothing for the children and encouraging the adults to resist drowning their despondency in alcohol. As he grew to know them, he found that these people were not wantonly homeless. He found that they were victims of deep emotional and spiritual wounds; that their capacity to cope with social responsibility had been slowly whittled away by unresolved childhood crises, and often relentless alcohol abuse which helped deaden their pain.

Once Sergeant Whitehead's eyes were opened to the plight of the homeless, he began to see others in the same circumstance.

They were everywhere in "idyllic and affluent" Orange County, but the community seemed ignorant of them - as he so recently was. He began to stand up in church, speaking softly at first, then loudly, chastising his fellow neighbors for failing to comfort these hurting people. As a handful of churchgoers responded to his impassioned pleas, the Marine used his formidable leadership skills to unite the volunteers and build the framework for the county's first Rescue Mission, which opened in a run-down office above a downtown Santa Ana shoe store.

From those humble beginnings, a rising tide of community support enlarged the Orange County Rescue Mission through several temporary buildings and residential homes. Soon, the Orange County Rescue Mission became the county's largest privately funded human service agency for the poor and homeless. This was achieved without one penny of the taxpayers' money.

Throughout the ensuing decades since that epochal day in 1963, as people saw the needs which the Rescue Mission was able to meet through their help, that support has grown. Providentially (and ironically), OCRM's flagship transitional living facility, the Village of Hope, was built on the former Tustin Marine Base, a mere "stone's throw" from the mess hall from which Sergeant Whitehead fed his first homeless families.

The Orange County Rescue Mission continues to implement innovative programs designed to offer the greatest long-term benefit to those who take advantage of them. Thank you for being a part of our growing vision. We hope you will continue to see the value in what we are doing and join us in this great work!


Program accomplishments

1,580,913 meals
115,375 nights of shelter
1,088,345 clothing items
51,667 children's education sessions
53,631 medical and mental health services
35,542 adult education and training sessions


Needs

Urgent Needs:
- Liquid hand soap
- Soap bars
- Shampoo bottles
- New underwear for kids
- New underwear for women
- Toothpaste tubes
- Razors
- Shaving cream
- Feminine hygiene products
- Laundry detergent
- Toilet paper rolls
- Twin sheet sets
- Bath towels
- Pillows